Ogden, UT

Union Pacific VP-Public Affairs Scott Moore, Ogden Mayor Mike Caldwell, and Dan Harbeke, UP director - Public Affairs.

Union Pacific VP-Public Affairs Scott Moore, Ogden Mayor Mike Caldwell, and Dan Harbeke, UP director - Public Affairs.

On March 8, 1869, Union Pacific Railroad Company steamed into the frontier town of Ogden, Utah.  Amidst much celebration and excitement, the culture and makeup of the town changed forever.  Union Pacific Railroad brought jobs, immigrants, writers, national office holders, inventions and opportunities.

Ogden is one of the most diverse cities in the State of Utah because of Union Pacific’s presence.  When the transcontinental railroad celebrated completion with the driving of the gold spike on May 10, 1869, Ogden already knew what it took to be home to a railroad company.  When it came time to select a city to serve as the junction of five different railroads, including Union Pacific, Ogden was the best choice.  For more than 90 years, Ogden was the hub for all passengers traveling east, west, north or south – hence the title “Junction City of the West.”
 
Through the years, trains hauled freight, moved passengers and represented adventure, livelihood and opportunity.  From this small town on the edge of the Great American Desert, Union Pacific offered access to the riches and wonders of America’s East Coast.  Taking his inventions with him, John M. Browning used Union Pacific passenger service to travel to his meetings with Winchester Arms.  Al Capone called on Ogden in the 1920s.  Eleanor Roosevelt stopped in during the 1940s.  Elvis even made a stop to play a tune for a local high school.
 
For more than 143 years, Union Pacific has been a participant in the development of this community.  They have played a key role in Ogden's past, and they are an important partner in its future.  Ogden is proud to be a Union Pacific town.